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75 T-Poly students sacked for falsifying grades

"Seventy-five students of the Takoradi Polytechnic have been sacked for allegedly using falsified West Africa Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE) grades to gain admission to the institution."

Source: Graphic Online

Posted on : Mon 21 Apr 2014

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Seventy-five students of the Takoradi Polytechnic have been sacked for allegedly using falsified West Africa Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE) grades to gain admission to the institution.

Some of the affected students claimed they either had sex with or paid money to some “lecturers” and middlemen before being offered admission.

Others also claimed it was their friends and seniors in the school who introduced them to the middlemen.

The affected students are said to have had their D7, E8 and F9 grades falsified to A1 to C6 to be admitted.

The situation has created an uneasy calm on the campus and the students are discussing the issue.

Registrar

When contacted, the Registrar of the polytechnic, Mrs Silvia Oppong-Mensah, said the affected students were Higher National Diploma (HND) students who were admitted a year ago.

She said after the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) had certified the results, the names of the affected students were posted on the school’s notice board and the students were asked to defend it, using their original slips.

“Only two of the affected students came with certified results from WAEC and were allowed to continue their programmes,” she said.

Mrs Oppong-Mensah said the polytechnic was currently left with no option but to show the students the exit, since they did not qualify for admission.

Some of the students, she said, had been in the school for a year but were not aware that the polytechnic had taken their slips to the examining body for verification.

Parents must show concern

Mrs Oppong-Mensah said if parents were concerned about their children’s admission needs, they would have realised that their children were not qualified.

They even paid admission and hostel facility fees, only to be told that the middlemen had falsified their results, she said.

“It was wrong to pay money to middlemen who are walking around the campus and post offices claiming they are lecturers and have links to the school authorities. Let me say that there is no such thing like connection to compromise the hard-earned reputation of the school,” she warned.

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